Featherstone One Name Study

Featherstone surname study registered with the Guild of One Name Studies



Alexander Fetherstonhaugh

Male Abt 1273 - Abt 1356  (~ 83 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Alexander Fetherstonhaugh  [1
    Born Abt 1273  [2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Reference Number 34984 
    Died Abt 1356  [1, 3
    Person ID I34984  Featherstone Main
    Last Modified 16 Jul 2016 

    Father Thomas Fetherstonhaugh,   b. Abt 1255,   d. Aft 1312  (Age ~ 58 years) 
    Mother Mariota (Unknown),   d. Aft 1336 
    Married Abt 1275  [4
    Family ID F10921  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Children 
     1. Thomas Fetherstonhaugh,   d. Abt 1374
     2. Alexander Fetherstonhaugh, ii,   d. Aft 1421
     3. Francis Fetherstonhaugh,   d. Bef 1374?
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F10924  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Arms & Heraldry
    Alexander i his arms
    Alexander i
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron charged with three crescents sable between threeostrich feathers argent; Alexander Fetherstonhaugh
    2nd Son
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron
    charged with three
    crescents sable between three ostrich feathers argent

    Attributed Arms

    The Law of Arms and the regulation of Arms in England underwent changedradically during the Later Middle Ages and particularly in the Tudorperiod. Regulation came under the authority of Royal Officers the Kingsof Arms and the College of Arms. The Kings of Arms enforced strictregulations for the regulation and marshalling of arms. In manyinstances where the actual arms used by distant forbears had beenforgotten Tudor Heralds would extrapolate retrospectively to re-createthe arms they expected individuals in the past to have used, such armsare called 'attributed arms'. Sometimes it is possible to trace oldseals and documents to find out what arms individuals actually used inthe early days of heraldry. What one often finds is that because therules applied to heraldry in the early Middle Ages were applied muchless strictly a Nobleman might adopt arms which did not adhere strictlyto the later established rules; so attributed arms and the actual armsborn by individuals in the early Middle Ages are often somewhatdifferent.
    arms
    arms
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron charged with three crescents sable between threeostrich feathers argent; Alexander Fetherstonhaugh
    2nd Son
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron
    charged with three
    crescents sable between three ostrich feathers argent

    Attributed Arms

    The Law of Arms and the regulation of Arms in England underwent changedradically during the Later Middle Ages and particularly in the Tudorperiod. Regulation came under the authority of Royal Officers the Kingsof Arms and the College of Arms. The Kings of Arms enforced strictregulations for the regulation and marshalling of arms. In manyinstances where the actual arms used by distant forbears had beenforgotten Tudor Heralds would extrapolate retrospectively to re-createthe arms they expected individuals in the past to have used, such armsare called 'attributed arms'. Sometimes it is possible to trace oldseals and documents to find out what arms individuals actually used inthe early days of heraldry. What one often finds is that because therules applied to heraldry in the early Middle Ages were applied muchless strictly a Nobleman might adopt arms which did not adhere strictlyto the later established rules; so attributed arms and the actual armsborn by individuals in the early Middle Ages are often somewhatdifferent.
    arms
    arms
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron charged with three crescents sable between threeostrich feathers argent; Alexander Fetherstonhaugh
    2nd Son
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron
    charged with three
    crescents sable between three ostrich feathers argent

    Attributed Arms

    The Law of Arms and the regulation of Arms in England underwent changedradically during the Later Middle Ages and particularly in the Tudorperiod. Regulation came under the authority of Royal Officers the Kingsof Arms and the College of Arms. The Kings of Arms enforced strictregulations for the regulation and marshalling of arms. In manyinstances where the actual arms used by distant forbears had beenforgotten Tudor Heralds would extrapolate retrospectively to re-createthe arms they expected individuals in the past to have used, such armsare called 'attributed arms'. Sometimes it is possible to trace oldseals and documents to find out what arms individuals actually used inthe early days of heraldry. What one often finds is that because therules applied to heraldry in the early Middle Ages were applied muchless strictly a Nobleman might adopt arms which did not adhere strictlyto the later established rules; so attributed arms and the actual armsborn by individuals in the early Middle Ages are often somewhatdifferent.
    arms
    arms
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron charged with three crescents sable between threeostrich feathers argent; Alexander Fetherstonhaugh
    2nd Son
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron
    charged with three
    crescents sable between three ostrich feathers argent

    Attributed Arms

    The Law of Arms and the regulation of Arms in England underwent changedradically during the Later Middle Ages and particularly in the Tudorperiod. Regulation came under the authority of Royal Officers the Kingsof Arms and the College of Arms. The Kings of Arms enforced strictregulations for the regulation and marshalling of arms. In manyinstances where the actual arms used by distant forbears had beenforgotten Tudor Heralds would extrapolate retrospectively to re-createthe arms they expected individuals in the past to have used, such armsare called 'attributed arms'. Sometimes it is possible to trace oldseals and documents to find out what arms individuals actually used inthe early days of heraldry. What one often finds is that because therules applied to heraldry in the early Middle Ages were applied muchless strictly a Nobleman might adopt arms which did not adhere strictlyto the later established rules; so attributed arms and the actual armsborn by individuals in the early Middle Ages are often somewhatdifferent.
    arms
    arms
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron charged with three crescents sable between threeostrich feathers argent; Alexander Fetherstonhaugh
    2nd Son
    Attributed Arms:.
    Arms:. Gules a chevron
    charged with three
    crescents sable between three ostrich feathers argent

    Attributed Arms

    The Law of Arms and the regulation of Arms in England underwent changedradically during the Later Middle Ages and particularly in the Tudorperiod. Regulation came under the authority of Royal Officers the Kingsof Arms and the College of Arms. The Kings of Arms enforced strictregulations for the regulation and marshalling of arms. In manyinstances where the actual arms used by distant forbears had beenforgotten Tudor Heralds would extrapolate retrospectively to re-createthe arms they expected individuals in the past to have used, such armsare called 'attributed arms'. Sometimes it is possible to trace oldseals and documents to find out what arms individuals actually used inthe early days of heraldry. What one often finds is that because therules applied to heraldry in the early Middle Ages were applied muchless strictly a Nobleman might adopt arms which did not adhere strictlyto the later established rules; so attributed arms and the actual armsborn by individuals in the early Middle Ages are often somewhatdifferent.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1214] The Featherstone Family News, Varoius, (The Featherstone Society, 14 Heddon Grove, from 1997 to present day), Issue 2
      1323. 30 July. Thomas "and his brother, Alexander," were rewarded with agrant from the King of the land in Sedburgh in Lonsdale, Yorkshire,forfeited by the rebel, Andrew de Harcla**.

    2. [S1214] The Featherstone Family News, Varoius, (The Featherstone Society, 14 Heddon Grove, from 1997 to present day), Issue 2
      1323. 30 July. Thomas "and his brother, Alexander," were rewarded with agrant from the King of the land in Sedburgh in Lonsdale, Yorkshire,forfeited by the rebel, Andrew de Harcla**.
      ***"The Featherstones of England", A Family History." Dr. Hans W andMrs. Elizabeth Meier, 1995
      **"Featherstoniana" Dr C P Cuttino

      * "A History of Northumberland." John Hodgson, 1840.

    3. [S1214] The Featherstone Family News, Varoius, (The Featherstone Society, 14 Heddon Grove, from 1997 to present day), Issue 2
      ALEXANDER is recorded as the second son after Thomas and must have beenof mature years in 1306 when by deed he gave to Thomas Tuggen-hali,vicar of Haltwisill, all his lands in Wyden and Redepath*. An inquestheld at Newcastle suggests that he died c. 1365*. Other dates and eventsrelating to this Alexander are:
      In 1331 King Edward III appointed Alexander to the custody of LimerickCastle in Ireland and to the office of Constable of Dublin Castle**.
      In 1332 Alexander drew wages for a mission from Ireland to England.Anthony de Lucy the Justiciar of Ireland, the Chancellor and theTreasurer had sent him to report to the King on the state of thecountry**.
      1347 Back in England, Alexander served on a commission to inquire intothe devastation by the Scots of the de Lucy lands in Northumberland**.1352-4, 1356,
      1355 His services to the Crown gained him exemption from being put onassizes, juries or recognitions and from appointment as mayor, sheriff^eschastor, coroner, bailiff or other minister of the King without hisconsent**. 1358. Several writs addressed to Alexander as Collector ofCustoms to levy Knight's Fees in Northumberland**.
      Alexander held the Manor of Featherstonhalgh of the de Lucy family byhomage and service of 20s 7d yearly**.
      ***"The Featherstones of England", A Family History." Dr. Hans W andMrs. Elizabeth Meier, 1995
      **"Featherstoniana" Dr C P Cuttino

      * "A History of Northumberland." John Hodgson, 1840.

    4. [S1213] A History of Northumberland, John Hodgson, (Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, 1840), A clue to Mariota's origines. It is not clear whether Mariota was a widowin 1312 but we are told that her son Thomas granted the manor ofFetherstan-halg to her in 1336*. This suggests that Mariota was marriedto the third Thomas.